Nature and Ecology

Wavegarden Scotland is committed to managing and enhancing the ecological integrity of Craigpark Quarry, and the natural environment of the site has always been central to the ethos and focus of our plan, with additional fauna and improved habitat development integral to our vision. The planned water management of the site has been formulated into a series of integrated wetland habitats connecting from the wildlife corridor of the canal into the heart of the development to facilitate and accelerate the recolonisation of the former quarry.

What has happened so far with ecology and protected species within Craigpark Quarry?

We have carried out every ecological survey requested by the planning authority – this includes a habitat survey which informed the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in the planning application, made in May 2017. The EIA includes necessary construction mitigation procedures for any protected species found on site.

The detailed survey results cannot, by law, be made part of the publicly available information on the Council’s planning portal, as they are treated as confidential due to potential threat to protected species.

What plans are in place ahead of the start of construction regarding ecology?

Before construction starts for Wavegarden Scotland we will carry out a further protected species survey to determine if any addition mitigation measures are required.

The Wavegarden Scotland site, once operational, will provide a diverse mix of habitat to maximise biodiversity appropriate to the current environment.

Will you be removing trees on site ahead of or during construction?

No, there are no trees planned for removal as part of the Wavegarden Scotland proposal.

Has construction for Wavegarden Scotland started already? (May 2019)

Wavegarden Scotland construction has not started and no work will take place without the relevant permissions. All work to date has been undertaken in relation to the planning approvals for the restoration of the quarry to a Country Park. 

What plans are in place for any species currently living on the site before construction starts?

The current site provides limited habitat for a small number of protected species which have managed to colonise the site during the historic operation of the quarry.

Species may be subject to some level of disturbance during construction of the development, and licenses will be secured from Scottish Natural Heritage where required to facilitate this, but the operational site will offer a much more varied and permanent mixture of habitat, allowing bio-diversity to thrive.

How will the country park benefit local ecology and wildlife?

The planned water management of the site has been formulated into a series of integrated wetland habitats connecting the wildlife corridor of the canal into the heart of the development to facilitate and accelerate the recolonisation of the former quarry. The maintenance of the site’s meadows, grasslands and emerging woodlands will offer a refuge for a variety of native and transient wildlife.

Will Wavegarden Scotland look like a natural environment?

We understand that surfing for lots of people is as much about being out in the natural environment as it is about catching waves. We intend to create an ecologically and resource-conscious destination for surfers and non-surfers that provides the feeling of being at one with nature. We will do this through the use of high quality soft landscaping, tree planting and natural materials within a consented country park.